Moments of Solidarity - UCSF BCH Against Racism

The BCH community came together last week to reflect on a country where Black lives mean so little that violent killing after violent killing has become a norm and where African Americans are disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. For African Americans this moment is only a convergence of all of the racial violence, police brutality, health disparities, wealth gap and lack of access to education that has been the very fabric of the U.S. for 400 years. 

Dealing with these public health issues requires faculty, staff and trainees here at BCH to go within and see that we have to do better on an individual level at the same time as we are trying to address health care disparities on an institutional level. The BCH Leadership is working with the DEI Committee to create a roadmap to bring our institution to the place where everyone has equal opportunity to advance, where the faces of our employees at every level reflect the diversity of the communities that we serve and where every employee has the tools and feels the safety to deal with micro aggressions as they come up.

The BCH community must come together to make this moment different, to make this a moment when we take decisive action to end injustices. 

 


UCSF Solidarity and Healing

May 25, 2021, 12:30 pm - 1:00 pm 

You also are invited by the UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospitals (BCH) DEI Council and Spiritual Care Services-SF to join an online space of solidarity and care, to honor all that we may be feeling on the one-year anniversary of George Floyd’s murder, as well as to uplift and honor positive signs of change for racial justice.

Presenters:

  • Corey Jackson | Vice Chancellor for Human Resources
  • Susan Conrad | Chaplain/Director of Spiritual Care (SF)
  • Isoke Femi | Maven of Transformational Learning at GLIDE
  • Stephanie Brown | Co-Chair of UCSF BCH Black Caucus

Click HERE for recording


Colliding Pandemics: Loss, Grief & Race during COVID-19 Part 3

Wednesday, June 17, 2020
Town Hall Recording 

On Wednesday, June 18, we hosted our 3rd BCH Cross-Bay Town Hall, “Colliding Pandemics: Loss, Grief & Race During COVID-19, Part 3.” Thank you to our panelists – Alvin Hendrix Sr., Dr. Michael Bell and Ejiofor Nnaemeka – and our speakers and moderators – Dr. Marsha Treadwell, Saun-Toy Latifa Trotter, Jamie Phillips, Dr. Steve Wilson, George Weiss and Kim Murphy. BCH Leadership is committed to listening, learning, and taking the hard steps to shift our culture, with accountability. We greatly appreciate your participation and perseverance as we work together to bring change.

Colliding Pandemics: Loss, Grief & Race during COVID-19 Part 2

Tuesday, June 9, 2020
Town Hall Recording 

On Tuesday, June 9, we hosted our BCH Cross-Bay Town Hall, ”Colliding Pandemics: Loss, Grief & Race During COVID-19, Part 2 to further our critical and difficult discussions around systematic and structural racism, health inequity and the COVID-19 pandemic. This Cross-Bay Town Hall was intended to foster dialogue, awareness, and understanding, coupled with a commitment to work together towards solutions, in our renewed intention for close cross-bay collaboration. 

DEI Needs Assessment Key Findings Overview presented by Marsha Treadwell 

Our panel for discussion includes:

Lee Atkinson-McEvoy, MD, Chief Division of General Pediatrics and Vice Chair for Primary Care and Population Health

Kendell Hardy, Strategic HR Business Partner

Marsha Treadwell, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics and Co-Chair, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI)


BCH Moment of Solidarity

June 3, 2020

At 3:30 pm on June 3, 2020, both BCH Oakland and Mission Bay campuses took a moment to reflect and express solidarity on the current events involving the deaths of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and countless other African Americans. 


Colliding Pandemics: Loss, Grief & Race During COVID-19

Tuesday, June 2, 2020
Town Hall Recording

This town hall session, Colliding Pandemics: Loss, Grief & Race During COVID-19, is intended to foster dialogue, awareness, and understanding, coupled with a commitment to work together towards solution, in our renewed intention for close cross-bay collaboration.

 

Our panel for discussion includes:

Marsha Treadwell, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics and Co-Chair, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI)

Saun-Toy Trotter, MFT, Program Manager: School Based Behavioral Health and Chair Trauma Informed Care Committee

Dr. Dayna Long, BCH Oakland Medical Staff member and Co-Director, Center for Child and Community Health

 

Anti-Racism Resources

Unconscious Bias Education and Training

UCSF Office of Diversity and Outreach offers resources, definitions and trainings on Unconcious Bias.

Race Matters: How to Talk Effectively About Race

by Dorlee. Social Work Career

A Practioner's Guide for Advancing Health Equity - Community Strategies for Preventing Chronic Disease

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 

Anti-racism resources for white people

This document is intended to serve as a resource to white people and parents to deepen our anti-racism work. If you haven't engaged anti-racism in the past, start now.  

"We are Living in a Racist Pandemic" says APA President

May 29, 2020. American Psychological Association

Your Black Colleagues May Look Like They're Okay - Chances Are They're Not

Danielle Cadet. May 28, 2020

Affirming Black Lives Without Inducing Trauma

Teaching Tolerance. May 8, 2020

Confronting Racism in Communities

Guidelines and Resources for Anti-Racism Training Workshops

Racial Equity Tools

Racial Equity Tools is designed to support individuals and groups working to acheive racial equity. This site offers tools, research, tips, curricula and ideas for people who want to increase their own understanding and to help those working toward justice at every level - in systems, organizations, communities and culture at large.

Asian American Racial Justice Toolkit

This toolkit is a project of love from the grassroots, from and by Asian American communities. As Asian Americans, we believe that our liberation is tied to Black liberation and we continue to dream about a world where all of our people will be free. The toolkit would not have been possible without the following organizations and individuals:

Syllabus: 21- Day Racial Equity Habit-Building Challenge

The Challenge invites participants to complete a syllabus of 21 short assignments (typically taking 15-30 minutes), over 21 consecutive days, that include readings, videos or podcasts. It has been intentionally crafted to focus on the Black American experience. The assignments seek to expose participants to perspectives on elements of Black history, identity and culture, and to the Black community’s experience of racism in America. Even this focus on Black Americans cannot possibly highlight all of the diversity of experiences and opinions within the Black community itself, much less substitute for learnings about any other community of color. This syllabus is but an introduction to what we hope will be a rewarding journey that extends far beyond the limits of this project.


ARTICLES 

Policy Statement: The Impact of Racism on Child and Adolescent Health

Maria Trent, MD, MPH, FAAP, FSAHM,a Danielle G. Dooley, MD, MPhil, FAAP,b Jacqueline Dougé, MD, MPH, FAAP,c Section on Adolescent Health, Council on Community Pediatrics, Committee on Adolscence. American Academy of Pediatrics. Volume 144, number 2, Augsut 2019

The Greatest White Privilege Is Life Itself

By Ibram X. Kendi. The Atlantic. October 24, 2019

Miles to Go before We Sleep: Racial Inequities in Health 

by David R. Williams. Journal of Health and Social Behavior 53(3) 279-295

The Many Ways Institutional Racism Kills Black People 

by Khiara M. Bridges. Time. June 11, 2020

Minneapolis Police use Force Against Black People at 7 Times the Rate of Whites

By Richard A Oppel Jr. and Lazaro Gamio. The New York Times. June 3, 2020

Black Americans 2.5X More Likely Than Whites to be Killed by Police

by Willem Roper. Statista. June 2, 2020

Risk of being killed by police use of force in the United States by age, race-ethnicity and sex

by Frank Edwards, Hedwig Lee, and Michael Esposito. August 5, 2019

  • about 1 in every 1,000 black men can expect to be killed by police
American police shoot, kill and imprison more people than other developed countries. Here's the data

By Rob Picheta and Henrik Pettersson, CNN. June 8, 2020

  • Police are 4X more likely to use force on black people than white people 
  • Black Americans make up a third of the US prison population, despite only making up around an eighth of the country's total population.
These 4 charts describe police violence in America

by Tucker Higgins and John W. Schoen. CNBC. June 4, 2020.

Asian Americans, Here's How We Can Be Better Allies to the Black Community

by Yerin Kim. Popsugar. June 10, 2020


BOOKS

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo. June 26, 2018

White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide by Carol Anderson. September 5, 2017

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander.  January 16, 2012

Books to Read for a Better Understanding of Systemic Racism, Whiteness and the Black Experience

by Morgan Smith and Sam Gillette. People. June 11, 2020

This List of Books, Films and Podcasts About Racism is a Start, Not a Panacea

by Isabella Rosario. NPR. June 6, 2020

An Anti-Racist Graphic Novel Reading List 

by Publishers Weekly Staff. Publishers Weekly. June 11, 2020


VIDEOS

 

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah - May 29, 2020

Trevor shares his thoughts on the killing of George Floyd, the protests in Minneapolis, the dominos of racial injustice and police brutality, and how the contract between society and black Americans has been broken time and time again

 

Where Do We Go From Here? Part 1 - Oprah Winfrey Network. June 9, 2020

Oprah Winfrey leads the conversation speaking directly with Black thought leaders, activists and artists about systematic racism and the current state of America. Featured guests include: Stacey Abrams, Charles M. Blow, Keisha Lance Bottoms, Ava DuVernay, Jennifer Eberhardt, Nikole Hannah-Jones, Ibram Kendi, David Oyelowo, Rashad Robinson and Bishop William J. Barber II.

 

Where Do We Go From Here? Part 2 - Oprah Winfrey Network. June 10, 2020

Oprah Winfrey leads the conversation speaking directly with Black thought leaders, activists and artists about systematic racism and the current state of America. Featured guests include: Stacey Abrams, Charles M. Blow, Keisha Lance Bottoms, Ava DuVernay, Jennifer Eberhardt, Nikole Hannah-Jones, Ibram Kendi, David Oyelowo, Rashad Robinson and Bishop William J. Barber II.

 

Police: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver - June 7, 2020

As nationwide protests over the deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor are met with police brutality, John Oliver discusses how the histories of policing and white supremacy are intertwined, the roadblocks to fixing things, and some potential paths forward.

 

Woman Convinces Merriam-Webster To Update Definition Of Racism | Rachel Maddow | MSNBC - June 10, 2020

Kennedy Mitchum talks with Ali Velshi about her correspondence with Merriam-Webster, ultimately convincing the dictionary publisher to adjust its definition of the word racism.

 

Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing - Stanford Talisman Alumni Virtual Choir

We are Stanford Talisman, a group of singers on Stanford’s campus who since our origins have sung music stemming from Black liberation struggles across the world. Our alumni and current group came together to create a virtual choir of Lift Every Voice and Sing, the Black National Anthem in America. We are also actively raising funds for organizations contributing to the movement for Black lives in America. If you’d like to contribute, check our Instagram story (@stanfordtalisman) for more details or Venmo @SU-acappella-blm to donate to the American Civil Liberties Union. All proceeds will be matched x5!